Communications and Society blog: By and for students in Marist COM 201

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Are parents confusion of ratings leading to acts of violence?

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People are constantly wondering how films and television shows are rated.  There are many statistics that prove most parents aren’t clear as to what the ratings mean.  In a poll by parents.org, 28% of parents with children between the ages of 2-6 years old understand that the rating Y7 is directed for children 7 years and older.  13% of parents think the rating Y7 means the opposite, geared towards children 7 years old and younger.  Another confusion is the ratings of FV, 12% of the same group of parents know that the rating  means “Fantasy Violence”.  8% of the same group think that this rating means “family viewing.”  I found the statistics about the rating FV  very interesting because this means that parents may now think that fantasy violence is for family viewing.  The statistics go on to say that when children witness violence at a younger age, they become desensitized with a lack of sympathy for human suffering.  I think it  could be possible that children are watching television at an age when imitation is there only reaction.  Children are most likely to think that violence is an accepted way to solve our problems.  Maybe since these children are watching television that isn’t intended towards their age group, this could solve the mystery as to why children are imitating acts of violence.

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Written by grogan321

March 2, 2010 at 3:12 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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